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Philanthropy Not Just for the Wealthy
Source: The Denver Post  ·  August 22, 2010  ·  Excerpt

Imagine what we would do if we could transform our community in just one way. Would we feed hungry children? Assist teen parents? Support the arts? Or would we look more broadly? Would we cure a disease? Save the rain forest? Provide education to women and children in Third World countries?

The answer is obvious . . . we'd do all that we could! There are literally thousands of ways we can transform the world to make it a place where all people and other living things can thrive.

Why don't we make that happen? Author Lynne Twist, "The Soul of Money," argues that we've succumbed to three "toxic myths" about the scarcity of money. First, that there's not enough money in our country (or world) to go around — so we grab all we can. Second, that making more money and accumulating more material possessions make us better. And third, that inequality, injustice and the fact that some people have much more than they need while others have barely enough to survive, is "just the way it is."

Twist asserts that those deeply rooted assumptions about money are wrong.

Our take
More often than not, philanthropy is about passion: donors seek out the programs, people or causes that appeal to them most, which then become the recipients of said donor's hard-won time, talent or treasure. Twist calls out several myths in the above excerpt that specifically relate to money, but there are no doubt others in regard to volunteerism and other noncash donations as well.

At Compass Pointe, we stay attuned to these shifting attitudes and practices so you don't have to. Contact us now for help answering these questions and more:

  • Is your organization operating under certain broad assumptions about donor motivations or charitable giving that you suspect may be outdated?
  • Are your organization's practices and policies built to shift and adapt to changing attitudes about giving, or are they more rigid? What is the best framework for you?

 

 
 
       
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